Cawthorn Roman Camps guide published

THE story behind Roman military defences in North Yorkshire have been unveiled in a new guide.

The three Roman military fortifications known as Cawthorn Camps was bought by the North York Moors National Park in 1983.

The 103-acre site is four miles from Pickering and the fortifications were built between AD90 and AD130.

Initial findings in the 1920s suggested the site was a training camp but later study found only one was a training camp.

The other two fortifications were permanent garrisons for Roman soldiers.

Now the authority has created a new revised guide to the historic site with information and illustrations.

It also contains an easily accessible one-mile loop walk giving an
insight into life and the events that took place on the land.

Mark Lewis, the park authority’s interpretation officer, said: “It
is amazing to think that the banks and ditches at Cawthorn, some of
which would have been dug in just a few hours, have survived nearly
2000 years.

“This revised guide will bring the place to life and help people to
walk in the footsteps of a Roman soldier learning about what they ate,
what kit they had to carry and the clever defences they used against
their enemies such as the intriguingly-named ankle breakers.”

The guide called Cawthorn Roman Camps Trail is priced £1.95 and on
sale from national park centres, the Pickering Tourist Information
Centre and the New Inn, in Cropton.

It can also be ordered on-line at http://www.moors.uk.net

See also http://www.visitnorthyorkshiremoors.co.uk/content.php?nID=17;id=499

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