‘EX ITHACA CUM AMORE Oδύσσεια’

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This epic production needs our help!

“We are making a professional film of Homer’s The Odyssey in a combination of Ancient Greek and Latin, ‘EX ITHACA CUM AMORE Oδύσσεια’ that we plan to distribute in 40 subtitled languages to every school and university in the world.

This is obviously a difficult film to finance through traditional methods therefore we have made a trailer to support the project and are self-funding the film by selling copies of our last film, and adaption of Machiavelli’s renaissance comedy The Mandrake Root.

I do hope that by watching the trailer you will recognise the investment we have made and understand our commitment to this project and will help us by making your membership aware of the project.

You can view the project and trailer at www.exithacacumamore.com

Many thanks
Simon Woods – Producer

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Italy’s Latin Revival

An Italian academy has brought Latin back from the grave with such success that it was forced to turn away hundreds of prospective students due to over-enrolment this academic year.

The Latin phrase Senatus Populusque Romanus (The Senate and the People of Rome), referring to the government of the ancient Roman Republic, used nowadays as an official signature of the city of Rome is seen on a monument in central Rome on February 9, 2010. AFP PHOTO / Filippo MONTEFORTE (Photo credit should read FILIPPO MONTEFORTE/AFP/Getty Images)

The Latin phrase Senatus Populusque Romanus (The Senate and the People of Rome), referring to the government of the ancient Roman Republic, used nowadays as an official signature of the city of Rome is seen on a monument in central Rome on February 9, 2010. AFP PHOTO / Filippo MONTEFORTE (Photo credit should read FILIPPO MONTEFORTE/AFP/Getty Images)

Vivarium Novum, a humanist campus set in a lush park with a swimming pool and basketball court, is part of the estate belonging to a religious order just north of Rome. Students here don’t just study Latin but learn to speak it fluently. Latin is not only confined to the classroom — in fact, Italian, English and French are strictly forbidden anywhere on campus. Students caught talking in “vulgar,” or writing notes in any other language, risk expulsion………

Read Silvia Marchetti’s article here