What is the best way to learn Latin?

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Seen on EIDOLON

“MF: Eleanor, your new book is a revelation! It shows that ancient Greeks learned Latin the way we learn modern languages. They memorized made-up dialogues — dialogues that illustrate stereotypical Roman culture — and only then went back and analyzed each word for its grammatical function. By contrast, a reader opening Reginald’s book might be surprised that he insists on total philological mastery. It seems completely different, but it obviously works, too. Do you see Reginald’s method as a total break from “the ancient way” (as your title aptly puts it)? Or do you see continuities?”

So begins a conversation between Michael Fontaine, Associate Professor of Classics at Cornell University. Eleanor Dickey, authoress of  “Learning Latin the Ancient Way: Latin Textbooks from the Ancient World”  and Daniel Gallagher , Reginald Foster’s longtime student and successor in the Office of Latin Letters at the Vatican.

Read the whole conversation here…...

The objective of Reginald Foster’s book – “Ossa Latinitatis Sola “is to get people into immediate contact with and understanding of genuine Latin authors, and for these encounters to grow into a love and use of the entire language in all its literary types and periods of time and authors of the past 2,300 years.”

You can hear him putting this into practice:

Listen to him teaching in his own inimitable style here…..

GCSE Latin – a Revision Handbook

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Iraklis Lampadariou has produced a revision handbook for GCSE Latin students. He writes:

“A revision handbook  for Year 11 students who wish to have a GCSE qualification in Latin Language can be downloaded  for free at www.saitabooks.eu/2017/02/ebook.213.html

This handbook is aimed at being a simple but efficient synopsis of all the grammar and syntax points that are required for the GCSE in Latin Language. It is designed for students in Year 11, but also for people who want to taste what Latin is all about. It might, however, be suitable as a resource for teachers who wish to teach their students following the way that it helped me to learn this highly inflected language; by using tables, diagrams and notes, all in nice memorable ‘boxes’.

Please be so kind to share your feedback with me. Thank you very much.”

Iraklis Lampadariou

website – problems resolved

ARLT is now back online at its usual address:

www.arlt.co.uk

For details of our March 4th Refresher Day, visit

http://www.arlt.co.uk/refresher.html

 

 

website problems – update

The ARLT website is now located here:

http://www.classicalresourcecentre.com/arlt/index.html

This is likely to be a long-term, temporary home and not all pages and/or files will be immediately available. If you have an interest or need for any specific item, please contact the webmaster

website problems

The ARLT website is currently experiencing problems and cannot be accessed. The Server wham-e.com is down and we can only wait until it is back up again. Further information, when available.

Full details of our Refresher Day for teachers, to be held at Solihull School on Saturday 4th March,  will be available here and, deo volente, on the website shortly.

The people who are bringing Latin to life

Ann Patty, writing in the Wall Street Journal celebrates the Paideia Institute’s annual “Living Latin in NYC” convention—two days of lectures, classes and conversations, all in Latin.

“classicists and grammar fans are speaking a language often called dead”

“Latin isn’t a dead language, it’s undead—it’s a zombie language. And this is the zombie apocalypse!”

“We’ve made it cool to speak Latin,” Dr. Pedicone (the 34-year-old classicist who co-founded the institute) said. “We’re proving that interest in the classical humanities is alive and well.”

Read the full article here:

http://www.wsj.com/article_email/the-people-who-are-bringing-latin-to-life-1466786605-lMyQjAxMTE2MjIxNTUyNzU1Wj

 

Rouse writes to a former pupil

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Amongst the memorabilia celebrating the 400th anniversary of the Perse School is a letter written by WHD Rouse in 1945 to a former pupil, Leslie Missen. The letter begins unpromisingly with the words:

“This is going to be a long letter, and dull.”

But continues confidently with

“But I think you will read it, because I know you.”

Rouse’s affection for his school and his pupils shines through

“You are one of my sons – all the OPs are my sons – and you will listen to pa because you ought. I am now rising 83, and I can’t last long: but I do hope to leave something good behind me. I will tell you later the kindly things. You saw the Perse School from the inside – and I want to show it to you from the inside.”

Read on here:

http://www.perse.org.uk/voicesblog/education-is-happinessif-the-life-is-there/