Sex slaves, public executions – yet

glorious art like this: A majestic Roman eagle, newly unearthed in London, believed to be the best-preserved ever in London

and a gripping account of life in AD100

At a cemetery on the eastern fringes of Roman London in AD100, a sombre, yet grand ceremony was taking place.

A prosperous citizen was being buried just outside the city boundaries – no Roman, however rich, could be buried within the city walls to prevent the spread of disease.

Mourners muttered prayers to the sun god, Mithras, as the body was laid to rest in its dark mausoleum.

Overlooking the body, at the far end of the tomb, loomed a majestic stone sculpture of a Roman eagle clutching a writhing snake in its beak. This noble eagle would guarantee the protection of Jupiter, king of the gods, in the afterlife. ……

Read more from Harry Mount

Greek Studies on Site 2014

 Greek Studies on Site is a center for the study of Classical literature and culture. It offers a series of seminars in collaboration with the Norwegian Institute at Athens. Its programs are open to students of Classics, Philosophy, History, and related disciplines, as well as adult learners with an interest in Ancient Greek culture. All seminars meet both indoors and out, with many sessions taking place in archaeological sites and museums.

Explore topics such as  Love in Greek Antiquity, Greek Mythology in Athens and Follow in the Footsteps of Socrates.  Find out more from the Greek Studies On Site website

Terrace Chants

Watch out for Jonathan Ross’ TV show tonight. It may well be featuring one or both of the Lampards.

Lampard Junior, whose qualification in Latin has been quoted by many a Latin teacher, to the extent that it has now become legendary, may be challenged to translate football chants, whose complex melodies seem familiar from the terraces, but whose Latinity is unfamiliar. Listen up for one or more of these:

Ten Men went to lift, went to lift Frank Lampard.
·      You’re going home in a F*cking ambulance.
·      Who ate all the pies.
·      I’m forever blowing bubbles.
·      We’ve got tiny (Cox) (small player called Dean Cox played for Leyton Orient)

·      Super, Super Frank.
·      Sit down, shut up. Sit down, shut up.
·      You’re not singing, you’re not singing, you’re not singing any more!

Latin versions courtesy of a well-known Classicist.

New from Open Book Publishers: Tacitus, Annals, 15.20­-23, 33­-45:

Following on from the success of their Cicero Against Verres,  Open Book Publishers now offer a new publication of this A2 level set text, comprising the Latin Text,  Study Aids with Vocabulary, and Commentary, translated and edited by Mathew Owen and Ingo Gildenhard.

This course book, the third in Open Book’s series of classics textbooks, offers a portion of the original Latin text, study aids with vocabulary, and a commentary.  Designed to stretch and stimulate readers, Owen’s and Gildenhard’s incisive commentary will be of particular interest to students of Latin at both high school and undergraduate level. It extends beyond detailed linguistic analysis and historical background to encourage critical engagement with Tacitus’ prose and discussion of the most recent scholarly thought.

Aimed at widening access to Classics among high school students and undergraduates, Tacitus can be read for free on-line at http://www.openbookpublishers.com/product/215/.

Like other books in this series, Tacitus is also available in an interactive format, developed by The Classics Library, which enables teachers to comment on and ask questions about every aspect of the text.  This interactive version can be accessed via the link above.

Open Book Publishers is a non-profit organisation, run by academics in Cambridge and London,   committed to making high-quality research freely available to readers around the world.

Latin in Belgium

Latin is used in Belgium in everyday life

charles

Follow this BLOG  for the evidence!

With thanks to Johan Viroux

http://latin-in-belgium.skynetblogs.be/

 

ludus

 

School Latin project lands European language award

The Iris Project has been bringing Latin to our Primary schools by means of its “Literacy through Latin ”  programme since 2007 and has now received European recognition.  My thanks to Shona Harrison for bringing this report from the Oxford Mail to our attention.

iris

Of the award, the Project Director, Lorna Robinson said

“We’re really excited at the news that the Literacy through Latin project has won this prestigious award.

The judge who visited our lessons was delighted at the pupils’ enjoyment of Latin and their engagement with our method of using storytelling to deliver Latin as part of literacy.

It shows that the project works and that it’s useful and interesting for pupils.  We hope the award will help us secure funding for this long-running project to expand and develop.”

Read the whole article here

“Sicily: the Land of Gods”

I’m a Greek and Latin teacher. I work as teacher in a Sicilian Liceo Classico and I cooperate with Catania University about these subjects: Greek Literature, Ancient Greek and Latin Grammar, Classical Philology, History of ancient theatre. UE financed me a project of 10.000 euros to promote a cultural exchange between an Italian and an English school about classical themes. Title of my project is “Sicily: the Land of Gods”. If you are interested in this project, please contact me!  Here is a brief presentation of the project.

scaliarosariogiovanni@gmail.com

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