Pictures from the ArLT INSET in Cambridge

Hellenic Book Service
Hellenic Book Service
OCR presentation
Full session
Full session
Peter Geall's school trips session
Peter Geall's school trips session
Full session
Wilf and David
Hilary Walters' Juvenal session
Peter Geall's school trips session

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Archaeologist joins call to save unique Roman Villa

http://media-newswire.com/release_1087360.html

An archaeologist at The University of Nottingham has joined the fight to protect the site of a unique Roman villa. The site, until recently buried under the old Southwell Minster School, has planning permission for 13 new homes. But experts say at least part of the land earmarked for development should be protected because of the villa remains and its special relationship with Southwell Minster, the Cathedral Church of Nottinghamshire.

(Media-Newswire.com) – An archaeologist at The University of Nottingham has joined the fight to protect the site of a unique Roman villa. The site, until recently buried under the old Southwell Minster School, has planning permission for 13 new homes. But experts say at least part of the land earmarked for development should be protected because of the villa remains and its special relationship with Southwell Minster, the Cathedral Church of Nottinghamshire.

The University of Nottingham is custodian of a remarkable archive of photographs and lecture slides bequeathed to the Department of Archaeology after the death of Charles Daniels who led the very first major excavation of the site in 1959 — before the Minster Grammar School was built.

Three hundred and fifty people who attended a recent public meeting were told by Dr Will Bowden, from the Department of Archaeology, that this was a fantastic opportunity to find out more about the history of Southwell and its Cathedral and Minster. Dr Bowden has joined with community groups in Southwell to call for full investigation of the site and for the area of the villa to remain free of development.

Roman remains were discovered under parts of Southwell as far back as the 1790s. Charles Daniels, who was employed by the Ministry of Works, led a team of archaeologists who found extraordinary plaster work dating back to the 2nd or possibly early 3rd century AD, painted with marine scenes of cupids which now adorn the walls of the Minster. They discovered the remains of baths which formed part of a villa. They also uncovered mosaics in what is thought to be the central room in the south wing of the villa — regarded as exceptional in the Midlands and North East in terms of size and quality.

When the Minster School was extended in the 1970s diggers unearthed and destroyed 225 skeletons. The skeletons were so badly damaged that they were reburied with minimal recording.

Most recently after the new Minster School was built and the old one was demolished to make way for 13 prestige homes archaeologists uncovered a huge wall of probable Roman date. They believe it could be the remains of a Roman temple precinct — although Dr Bowden remains uncertain about this. The wall is 20 metres long by two and a half metres tall and is made from large, smooth-faced sandstone blocks typically used for lavish Roman buildings.

Dr Bowden, an associate professor at the University, said: “The relationship with the minster is what makes this site so special; this is what gives it added value. We have known about the villa for a long time but we do not know anything about the period between the loss of the villa and the construction of the minster. The villa has to be seen as a key part of the minster complex and its origins. We don’t know what the link is yet but there almost certainly is one. There is an enormous potential for research — to put the whole thing into context. We cannot lose this opportunity because of a failure to protect the site.”

An imported Roman temple

I never knew that a temple from Leptis Magna had been given to George IV by the Bashaw of Tripoli. Anyway, it’s being restored.
Staines News

Runnymede’s Roman ruins back to their best

Mar 9 2009 By Russell Butt
Expert stonemason, Mick Murphy, does some intricate work on the final stone of the ruins

Expert stonemason, Mick Murphy, does some intricate work on the final stone of the ruins

The restoration of an ancient ruin was completed on Thursday when the final decorative stone was put into place.

A 25-tonne crane was needed to lower the final stone on top of the Roman pillars of the ‘thousands of years old’ Leptis Magna ruins in Windsor Great Park, Virginia Water, on March 5.

The moment marked the completion of a restoration project started in November to restore the condition of the ruins, which had weathered severely, since being brought to the UK from Libya in 1818.

The project also involved the re-standing of seven columns that had fallen and a new ground level viewing platform being built.

Windsor Great Park deputy ranger, Philip Everett, said the work was essential to maintain the historic integrity of the Grade I listed landscape.

He added: “The restoration is a fundamental part of our stewardship responsibilities and will allow visitors to see the Leptis Magna ruins as viewed by King George IV.

“The work will not only provide a new viewing point for the public, but we have secured the preservation of the ruins for generations to come.”

Given to King George IV as a gift from the Bashaw of Tripoli, the Roman ruins are the remains of an old temple, brought to England from Leptis Magna, in Tripoli nearly 200 years ago. The King’s favourite architect, Sir Jeffry Wyatville, decided to erect them on the southern bank of the lake in Virginia Water.
snr_leptis-magna_images Image 8

Heading the restoration project, conservation architect Barry Stow, said replacing the columns and entablatures was not straight forward.

He added: “One of the more challenging aspects of working on the restoration is that we do not fully know the architect’s original intention.

“We have artistic impressions but these tend to be romanticised and lack accurate detailsm, so we have to base our assessment on the first photographs of the Edwardian era, together with physical evidence on site.”

The Leptis Magna ruins will re-open to the public in late May.

Romans will be defeated on September 18th

Star Tribune

NEW ULM, Minn. – Roman soldiers will march on New Ulm this fall, and it’s a good bet it won’t turn out well for them.

About two dozen re-enactors from Chicago will participate in a three-day celebration of Hermann the German, who led troops that drove the Romans out of north central Europe in 9 A.D.

A statue of Hermann towers over the south-central Minnesota town. The celebration is set for Sept. 18-20 in Hermann Heights Park.

Event organizer John Makepeace says the challenge now is to find enough local make-believers to carry out the mock battle that will ensue after the Romans arrive.

Makepeace says the outcome is already settled. “Yes,” he says with a chuckle, “the Romans take a big hit on this one.”