From EDI to Catullus

It was a passing exchange on a busy corridor. The Head of ICT cornered me and opened with those dreaded words “I know you’re busy but…”  Before I could launch into just how busy I was with organising the day’s exams she asked me about EDI and whether I used it much as Exams Officer. Do I?! It’s the sine qua non of exams organisation these days, I suggested,  and reeled off all the processes. Well, could she bring some of her A Level students up to the Tower and could I give them a run-down on its benefits to an organisation? Quite a happy certe, followed by a “make sure you remind me”. By the time I returned to Tower Control – the memorandum was waiting in my inbox: “3.20pm ICT group in exams office for a party!!!” I couldn’t resist it.  cenabis bene, mi Fabulle  apud me…. I can  quote this verbatim but just so that I wouldn’t have to type it all in, I quickly googled the text and easily found it, of course – with this entry first up. Be sure to play the sound file for the discussion. 

http://blog.dickinson.edu/?p=9172

(and there are more poems of Catullus here:

http://blog.dickinson.edu/?cat=1299)

I enjoyed it ( pace one or two issues of pronunciation)  as a charming piece to bear in mind for the next time you are teaching this poem.

Anyway, I pasted the text into my email reply to the Head of ICT, translated it, tolerably well, for her and await her response. I can’t wait for 3.20!

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2 Responses

  1. I recommend to all colleagues that they have a look at the information about the Latin and Greek Festival to be held at Neumünster, Luxembourg, 28th-30th
    May, 2010. If you can go, good; if you cannot, let others know who might go.

    http://www.festival-latin-grec.eu

  2. FROM EDI TO CATULLUS

    Colleagues may be interested to know that there have been several pieces of correspondence recently on the Grex Latin Loquentium internet list concerning the interpretation of certain words in Catullus 13, especially on the possible meanings behind ‘unguentum’

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